Big Generator
Big Generator is the twelfth studio album by YES. It was released in 1987 on Atlantic Records’ Atco subsidiary label (YES‘ last studio album for Atlantic) and was the follow-up to the massively successful 90125 album.

Personnel

Jon Anderson

Jon Anderson
Vocals
Tony Kaye

Tony Kaye
Keyboards
Trevor Rabin

Trevor Rabin
Guitars, Vocals
Chris Squire

Chris Squire
Bass, Vocals
Alan White

Alan White
Percussion

Recommended Versions

Dan Hersch & Bill Inglot 2003 Stereo Remasters for Warner Music UK/USA

Big Generator
Big Generator Remastered in 2003 from the master tape of the original 1987 mix.
Available as:
HD 24-192 or 24-96 Downloads (no extra tracks) at HD Tracks, HiRes Audio
CD at Amazon
Vinyl LP as per original release (no extra tracks) at Amazon
MP3 Downloads at iTunes, Google Play, 7 Digital, Microsoft Store
Streaming at Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Rdio, Tidal
The Studio Albums
This Remaster of Big Generator is also available as part of the ‘Studio Albums 1969-1987‘ Box Set at Amazon.
The Box Set contains the following remastered albums and their original track listing (ie no bonus tracks): Yes, Time and a Word, The Yes Album, Fragile, Close to the Edge, Tales from Topographic Oceans, Relayer, Going for the One , Tormato, Drama, 90125, Big Generator. Each individual album comes in a gatefold sleeve that replicates the original LP packaging.


Isao Kikuchi 2013 Stereo Remasters for Warner Music Japan

High Vibrations
Big Generator is also available as part of the High Vibration SACD Box Set at Amazon.
High Vibration is a 16 x Hybrid SACD Box Set made for the Japanese fans, containing their first 13 albums on 15 discs plus a bonus disc of extra tracks. All Remastered by Isao Kikuchi at 24-96 & 16-44.1 with a 220 page book in Japanese.
Albums: Yes, Time and a Word, The Yes Album, Fragile, Close to the Edge, Yessongs, Tales from Topographic Oceans, Relayer, Going for the One , Tormato, Drama, 90125, Big Generator and a Bonus Disc.
Bonus Disc: Something’s Coming, Dear Father, Roundabout (Single Edit), America, Total Mass Retain (Single Version), Soon (Single Edit), Abilene, Run Through The Light (Single Version), Run With The Fox, Owner Of A Lonely Heart (Move Yourself Mix), Leave It (Single Remix), Big Generator (Remix).

Listen

Spotify

Dan Hersch & Bill Inglot 2003 Stereo Remasters

Soundcloud excerpts

Dan Hersch & Bill Inglot 2003 Stereo Remasters

Big Generator - by Chris Welch

After the enormous success of 90125 it seemed as if YES might finally be free of the traumas, splits and bust-ups that had become the pattern of their lives since the end of the Seventies. In the event, it turned out to be just the start of yet more upset. The band was destined to experience more dramatic changes which would ultimately result in not just one but two versions of YES.

The Eighties had begun with the upheaval caused by the departure of Rick Wakeman and Jon Anderson and their replacement by The Buggles. By the end of the decade Jon had left the group for a second time, only to be reunited with Rick Wakeman, Steve Howe and, unlikely as it may seem, original YES drummer Bill Bruford, in a rival ‘YES‘ that called itself ABWH. Chris Squire, Alan White and Trevor Rabin were left as the sole remaining members of what we might as well call the ‘official’ YES. Confusion and embarrassment reigned. Yet by 1991 the whole band was reunited in an act of atonement which led to an eight piece touring version of the group and a controversial album – which no one seems to admit to liking – called Union. It was enough to make a YES fan freak. Nevertheless, the band hung on to its core fanbase even though they kept coming back in different guises like actors in some Shakespearean comedy of errors.

It was certainly a trying time for Trevor Rabin, who with Chris Squire was faced with reconstructing the ‘official’ YES. Trevor must have felt he was building a shiny new skyscraper, while a bunch of eco-warriors were trying to erect a pagoda YES in the parking lot without planning permission. Rabin headed up the band which reassembled in the studios in 1985 to begin work on an album it was fervently hoped would equal the success of 90125. Studios in Italy and England were pressed into service with Trevor Horn brought back to assist with production. Then the whole caboodle headed for Los Angeles where production was taken over by Trevor Rabin and sound engineer Paul De Villiers. The result was Big Generator, released in September, 1987.

Remembers Alan White, “We started recording in Italy and did half the backing tracks. Then we came back to SARM studios in London with Trevor Horn and worked on the album there. The sessions produced ‘Rhythm Of Love‘ which is one of the most played radio songs in America. After that album we kind of split apart for a while.”

Trevor Horn encountered severe problems trying to produce the band. “I tried doing the next album Big Generator but I couldn’t finish it because the circumstances were different,” he says. “I did most of the backing tracks but it wasn’t finish-able from my point of view. They just couldn’t agree. Jon would write one thing, Trevor would write another, Chris would write something else and they’d fight about it and I was in the middle. And I’m sorry to say it’s down to one pile of shit being no different from another! In the end it’s down to who can finish the song off and nobody could on that record for me and nobody ever did. It wasn’t a case of being a committee. It was just warring factions trying to kill each other. When bands have been together for more than fifteen years they become completely money driven and it’s whoever is paying the money, where it’s coming from and what it’s being paid for that determines what gets done recording-wise.”

Given these circumstances it is no surprise that many who have worked with YES come away with a jaundiced opinion of them. Trevor Horn denies this. “Oh! I don’t have a jaundiced opinion of them. I quite miss them all and I had a lot of fun doing 90125. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not jaundiced about them at all. It’s just that keeping any kind of musical enterprise like that going for as long as it has, with all the egos involved, isn’t going to be easy. Just watch the movie This is Spinal Tap. There are elements of YES in that. Only, of course, YES are a vastly superior band!”

Trevor Horn has not heard their albums since Big Generator. He hasn’t listened to Talk or Open Your Eyes but he went back to see them play again on tour in the Nineties. “I think they should keep touring and keep playing concerts, like classical musicians do. Why not? It cheered me up when I saw Chris Squire play with YES at Labatt’s Apollo Hammersmith in 1998. I was right to think he was good. He always was! I like the stuff he plays with the songs. That’s what’s really clever, not the long bass solos. I’ve never heard anybody else do what he can with a song. The bass can be such an exciting instrument and yet in most people’s hands it is really boring.”

Chris Squire agrees it was difficult making Big Generator. “It took rather a long time,” he admits. “We fiddled around trying to record it in Italy for tax purposes, but the studios didn’t really work out, so we came back to London and for some reason Trevor Horn, who was going to produce it again, decided not to. Big Generator was a double platinum album but it lacked the lustre it started off with, although it had ‘The Rhythm Of Love‘ which was number two most played track on the radio in 1987.”

While most observers probably see YES merely in terms of a series of albums released by alternating line-ups over a long period of time with varying degrees of commercial success, their career must also be viewed against a background of little-publicised personal experiences. Like everyone else, successful rock musicians have their ups and downs. Indeed, the uncertainties of life that we all experience, money problems, matters of health – mental and physical – and shifting personal relationships, tend to be magnified due to the unreality of the rock star lifestyle. Jon Anderson and his wife Jenny split up in the early Eighties, and midway through the decade Chris Squire divorced his first wife Nicki, who later became a singer and produced several records. All these events would naturally impinge on the progress of the band and their relationships.

Says Chris Squire, “By the time we were making Big Generator I had moved to Los Angeles. Because of the breakdown of my marriage I left England to try a fresh approach by living in America. I wanted to see how it would work out and of course it was pretty much a big party for a couple of years. Living in Hollywood, Los Angeles in those days, someone, somewhere was having a party every night. There’d be an opening of a club or some awards ceremony, so for a couple of years there was a lot of parrying going on.”

By all accounts Chris was burning the candle at both ends. “I met a lot of interesting people but by the time it got to 1989 I realised if I was going to carry on living in Hollywood I’d have to treat it less like a party town and get down to the job of normal living. I’ve never bought a place in the States, I have always rented a house, which was a very wise move to make because ever since I moved to America the prices have been going down and down, especially when an earthquake happens, which is another big blow to house prices! I’ve been a lot better off renting. One day we might buy a house and my new wife Melissa and I debate on where that will be all the time.”

Certainly personal moods and circumstances can affect a musician’s output and creative judgement, and business pressures also play a part in moulding the eventual outcome of a project. Says Trevor Rabin, “When we did Big Generator the stuff just didn’t sound as good ‘live’. I was quite happy with some of the album. It was a weird kind of stage for the band. We’d just had this huge album 90125, the biggest YES ever had, and no one had ever experienced the kind of success we were enjoying. And so it was, ‘Okay, we’ll do the next album.’ Halfway through it the record company was saying to the world: ‘This is going to be the next Dark Side Of The Moon! There was a lot of pressure and it obviously wasn’t the next Dark Side Of The Moon. There were just two or three good moments. It’s quite funny. Billy Sherwood has told me since that it is one of his favourite albums of all time. So some people liked it and it sold pretty well. It’s platinum all over the place, although that’s not the criteria of whether it’s good or not. Trevor Horn started out producing it and although he and I have always got on really well, in the studio there were often heated arguments. But it was always for the right reasons. To our credit we are still close friends. I went to London a couple of years ago to be a session player on a Tina Turner album he was producing. So we’ve had our fun. I think he’s one of the finest producers around but on Big Generator he wasn’t too happy with working with Jon. That’s my perception of why he stepped aside. It was a pity because he had a lot of valuable input. Tony Kaye also didn’t respond to him creatively either and that led to a personal problem.

“A lot of people have ridiculed me for being a megalomaniac which couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s just because I played keyboards on the albums. And the reason I played keyboards was because Trevor Horn said, ‘I don’t want Tony Kaye playing keyboards.’ So I’ve heard it said I’m a megalomaniac. It’s not true. That’s Jon’s job. He proudly told me he used to be known as ‘Napoleon’ back in the early days. I said, ‘Well hold that thought while I’m in the band”

“Among the innovations Trevor introduced was a real brass section which many YES fans didn’t like. They claimed it was tampering with tradition. “If you don’t try and develop new ideas and take some risks, you never grow,” protests Trevor. A good example of new ideas employed during the recording was a bright yet strangely distant ambient sound – as if some of the instruments were being played in different rooms. “That’s because they are’ I had this weird idea while making Big Generator to do that. I had a friend with a studio in a castle on Lake Como near Caramati in Italy. The castle has these huge ballrooms. You could do drums in one room and guitars in another. I ended up mixing the album and producing it and I just went for shock value.”

Among the shocks are Trevor’s violent, off-the-stone-wall guitar breaks on the stomping ‘Rhythm Of Love‘ which has to be one of the finest examples of YES in dance mode. ‘Big Generator‘ too has a grindingly powetful riff broken up by stabbing brass flares which push Jon’s airy vocals into a pulsing metronomic groove; a thrusting performance by any band’s standards. Alan’s drums sound like they are breaking through the castle ramparts and enter into a battle with the guitar as Rabin and White lock together. More intergalactic guitar brings the piece to an abrupt cliffhanging conclusion. The ethereal quality of the slow paced ‘Shoot High Aim Low‘ is enhanced by some of Trevor’s most atmospheric extemporisation and Alan White’s thunderous bass drum fills could conceivably cause CDs to shatter and crack.

“Who says there’s gotta be a reason, who says there’s got to be an answer?” demands Jon over the gradually fading chorus of ‘Shoot High‘. It’s a masterful piece of production and a very clever arrangement on a piece that grows in stature with repeated plays. “That’s one of my favourite tracks on the album. We did it live for about twelve shows and then we dropped it,” says Trevor regretfully.

big generatorwhite
Alan White blasts away at high speed on ‘Almost Like Love‘, a performance which is also the closest Jon has got to doing a rap record, although at this tempo he sounds closer to Sting than Ice T. The guitar goes berserk as White locks into some of the fiercest off beat drumming of his career. In view of all this good work it is surprising the two Trevors expressed doubts about Big Generator. This track alone is worth the price of the album. Strings pave the way for the familiar intro to ‘Love Will Find A Way‘, clearly a classic YES pop song. The snappy accents that underscore the vocals and Alan’s rock steady beat are placed with precision timing. The ear catching line ‘I eat at Chez Nous‘, which suddenly leaps out of the mix, is strangely intriguing. Why this sudden sophistication, one wonders? Don’t rock musicians usually eat at McDonalds? Trevor Rabin conducted the strings on this track and says, “I hadn’t written for strings for years and it was the first time I had actually conducted since leaving South Africa. I wrote the arrangement, did all the copying and did it in all the keys and clefs that the instruments were in. So those are all real strings on that song. No samples!”
There are many more fine performances on the album. ‘Final Eyes‘ has a stirring acoustic ditty that harks back to the summery Seventies. It allows Jon Anderson to fully express his vocal character, which makes it all the more puzzling there should have been such dissent about his role in the band at this time. You can even hear what sounds like Tony Kaye’s Hammond in the distance. A sudden blast of enhanced snare drum is enough to knock your head off, especially when playing this on headphones, so beware all those of a nervous disposition. Listening to this album is rather like scanning the heavens with the Hubble Telescope. Amidst the cosmos you find layer upon layer of stars, even in the darkest parts of the sky. Here too you find clouds of star stuff- a spiral nebula of creativity. The penultimate track, ‘I’m Running‘, sounds astonishingly like early YES, as if it were a souped up ‘Time And A Word‘. Alan’s percussion provides a rich new seam of rhythmic impetus as he launches into a few choruses of Latin rhythm. The well placed Hammond organ tags are pure YES ’69 and the vocal harmonies swann all over the surging rise in both tempo and temperature. Even Trevor Rabin’s guitar breaks here sound for all the world like Peter Banks in full cry. It’s exciting stuff. If the band of ’69 had heard such production values they would surely have fainted clean away.
big generator kaye

After this nostalgic burn-up, in which old and new are so skilfully blended, Jon Anderson has the last word with his bell-like vocals given free rein of expression on the brief but touching ‘Holy Lamb (Song For Harmonic Convergence)‘. Although there were rows in the studio, there was peace and harmony on the record.

Says Trevor Rabin, “I actually thought in a lot of ways it was the best album I did with the band – in part. There were some parts that I thought shouldn’t have been there, like ‘Holy Lamb‘ which I thought was pretty weak. What’s a harmonic convergence? I don’t know. Ask jon. The album sold a couple of million but it certainly didn’t do as well as 90125. After that we kind of broke up for a short time and I did a solo album and tour. While I was doing that the ABWH thing started to happen.”

Excerpt from Close To The Edge: The Story of YES by Chris Welch.

Lyrics

Click on the song title to view the lyrics.

RHYTHM OF LOVE

Innocence no answer
To your breaking heart
If the situation
Sometimes falls apart
Then in this ecstasy
Your charms are frozen
No emotion falling through your arms

Morning, daydream, time still growing shorter
Take me over lead me to the water
To the rhythm of love
The rhythm of love
The rhythm of love

Why should I escort you
To your secret needs
Climbing up your ladder
I keep falling down
Anyway will do
Anyone will do
When you dance to your darkest tune
Surrounded
As you crawl around the room
Night time fever burning till you’re higher
Take me over lead me through the fire
The rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love
The rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love

Morning daydream midnight fever
Morning daydream midnight fever
Inhibitions keep you from your point of view
Information needing to confuse
In this situation I have found you
In the rhythm of
Morning daydream midnight fever
Morning daydream midnight fever
Rhythm of love
Rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love
Rhythm of love


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


BIG GENERATOR

Such a strange pre-occupation
Such a strange peculiar breed
How it’s shining in its armour
Made of gold and made of steel
It can strike a chord inside you
Like a generation’s need
Speaking happy words of promise

Big generator
Lives out of sight
Big generator
Hands upon the wheel

Moving to the left
Movin’
Moving to the right
big generator
moving through the night

Second nature sacrifice
Even if you close your eyes
We exist through this strange disguise

I have heard it said to someone
Or maybe it was me
There is a reason to experience
Psychedelic so we could see
To be growing up before us
Like the black and white of love
Be the focus
Be the chorus

Big generator
Hands upon the wheel
Big generator
In for the kill

Second nature comes alive
Even if you close your eyes
We exist through this strange device

Moving to the left
Moving to the right
Big generator
Moving through the night

We are the voices of the big generator

Moving through the night
Movin’

Flying out the soft machine, we offer
All surprise to you
Praise oh praise this anthem generator

Moving through the night
Movin’

We are the voice of every. . .


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


SHOOT HIGH, AIM LOW

We hit the blue fields
In the blue sedan we didn’t get much further
Just as the sun was rising in the mist
We were all alone we didn’t need much more

So fast this expedition
So vast this heavy load
With a touch of luck and a sense of need
Seeing the guns and their faces
We look around the open shore
Waiting for something

Shoot high break low
Aim high shoot low
Break high let go
Shoot high aim low

This was to be our last ride
With the steel guitar and the love you give me
Underneath the skin a feeling, a breakdown
Well we sat for hours on the crimson sand

Exchanges in the currency of humans bought and sold
And the leaders seem to lose control

Shall we lose ourselves for a reason
Shall we burn ourselves for the answer
Have we found the place that we’re looking for
Someone shouted “open the door”
Lookout

Shoot high break low
Aim high shoot low
Feeling of imagination
Break high let go
Shoot high aim low

Shoot high aim low
Nothing you can say
Shoot high let go
Takes me by surprise

Shoot high aim low
Who says’s there’s got to be a reason
Shoot high let go
Who says there’s got to be an answer

We were all alone, we didn’t need much more
Shoot high aim low
The sun’s so hard on this endless highway
Shoot high let go
Shoot high aim low
I’ve heard the singers, who sing of love
Shoot high let go
In the blue sedan we never got much further
Shoot high aim low


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


ALMOST LIKE LOVE

Who was it organising the right
To follow my leader
Seems we look and stand around waiting
For a sign from God
Speaking for myself
The christian need
The muslim need
The buddhist need
To testify the need for brotherly love

I know there’s so many hundred things
Things to talk about
Making us laugh
Just like a shakespeare revolution
Please organize our spiritual evolution
Do that you’ll feel it
And we’ll feel it
Appreciate it’s almost like love
It’s almost like love
It’s almost like love
It’s almost like love

Saint or sinner
Makes no difference in who you believe
In a world of superstition
Caught in a total nuclear greed

Pioneers of the twenty first century
Looking on and looking fast
To try and fix and try and help
This very need
I know there’s so many ways
That we can work it out
Whether we live or die

Please organize the simple evolution
so there’s got to be
so we can see
to be free
It’s almost like love
It’s almost like love
It’s almost like love

So promised in a hundred letters
Should be getting to you any time now
So promised a surprise for you
For getting so far from now
It’s almost like love
The way the first one out discovers
It’s almost like
How many times can you recover
It’s almost

It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like
It’s almost like love

 


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


Love Will Find A Way

You wanna get close to me
The feeling so clear
But I need some time to see
Vision through my tear
You wanna get next to me
I need your intrusion
I don’t need to be
Blinded by confusion

Here is my heart
Waiting for you
Here is my soul
I eat at chez nous

Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way for me and you

Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way

So you want to get over me
And that’s how you feel
Everything you want to be
Seems so unreal
I want to be all of you
And that’s the confusion
It’s so hard for me
To draw a conclusion

Here is my heart
Waiting for you
Here is my soul
I eat at chez nous

Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way

Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way

Love will find a way
I believe that there’s a way
If you want it to
Will love find a way
Love will find a way
Will love find a way
Love will find a way


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


FINAL EYES

Person to person woman to man
Sing me a story to reach me
Teach me to teach me to understand
All these emotions I miss you

So you leave her
Can’t believe her
Can’t escape
Final eyes
Final eyes

Person to person woman to man
Send me this song that will teach me
Like a river without a stream
Night time without dreaming
Send me this song that will reach me

So you leave me
Can’t deceive me
See through me
Final eyes
Final eyes

And I know you think there’s nothing
There’s nothing more to say
And I know that I’ve got something
I’ve got something to say

If ever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you

If ever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you

If ever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you

Person to person woman to man
Send me this song that will teach me
Like a river without a stream
Night time without dreaming
Send me this song that will reach me

So you leave me
Can’t deceive me
See through me
Final eyes

And I know you think there’s nothing
There’s nothing more to say
Don’t hide behind the headlines oh yea
I’ve got something to say

If ever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you
If ever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you

Whenever I needed
Whenever I needed
Whenever I needed

Someone

If ever I needed
Whenever I needed someone
You were there when I needed you

You saved me from falling
Saved me from falling
I’m so in love with you


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


I’M RUNNING

Jacaranda
Help me out tomorrow
Jacaranda
Don’t want to be alone
Keep falling over
A spell that brings me sorrow
Give and take
I shouldn’t be afraid
So you give me this big story
It wakes me every day
The challenge is to chase the sounds
Just to break away

And I’m running
Running
Yes I’m running
A simple peace
Just can’t be found
Waste another day
Blasting all their lives away
I’ve heard the thunder
Underground
Tunneling away
At the very soul of man

And I’m running
Yes I’m running
I’m running
Through a new world

There is the heart of millions
Seen as a godsend to us
There stands our future
There can be no denying
Simple as A B C D
There stands our children’s lives

All in the sharp step
As one together
All in all we race
As one
This time

A simple peace
Just can’t be found
Waste another day
Blasting all their lives away
I’ve heard the thunder
Underground
Tunneling away
At the very soul of man
At the very soul of man

And I’m running
Running
I’m running

See through science
Part of a back door
A door made up of doors
To an endless time
To a new world
Run

There in the heart of millions
Seen as a godsend to us
There stands our future
There can be no denying
Simple as A B C D
There stands our children’s lives

All in the sharp step
As one together
All in all we race
As one
This time

Hear this voice
Now and forever
This time, brothers in time
Is it hard to take
Take this coice
Is it hard to find
Now and forever
This fire brothers of fire
Hard to find

As it kicks so hard
Hard to find
As it kicks on time
As it kicks on time

There in the heart of millions
Seen as a godsend to us
There stands our future
There can be no denying
Simple as A B C D
As it kicks so
As it kick so
As it kick so
There in the heart of millions
Seen as a godsend to us

All in a sharp step
As one together
All in all we race
as one
this time

 


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn


HOLY LAMB

Holy lamb
See the world we stamped
Is it so low again
Like a light that’s lost upon the stage
So the more it swings, it goes away

Surely then
See the curtain rising to show us once again
All the magic of the earth and the skies
See the more we find
The more we realize

That every time
See the laws of nature keep telling us like a friend
It’s the spirit of emotion dancing to the wind
High above
High above
So sure inspired again

I can tell a new story now
Can we see through this mask of uncertainty
Surely now
How can it be so hard when all there is to know
Don’t be afraid of letting go
It takes a loving heart
To see and show
This love
For our own ecology

Hold the light
Hold the light
Out of love we’ll come a long long glorious way
At the start of every day
A child begins to play
And all we need to know
Is that the future is a friend of yours and mine


PEFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – Vocals
Tony Kaye – Keyboards
Trevor Rabin – Guitars, Keyboards, Backing Vocals
Chris Squire – Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals
Alan White – Drums & Percussion


PRODUCED BY

Yes, Trevor Rabin, Paul De Villiers & Trevor Horn




Twitter & Instagram


Tag your Big Generator Instagrams #biggenerator to appear here.
We’d love to see your photos, t-shirts, ticket stubs and memorabilia etc.



Find the album on Facebook


Facebook Comments

Join in the conversation – sign in with your Facebook account to comment below.